9 Best Snowboard Bindings Reviews 2020 | For Responsiveness, Stability & Safety

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3 Top Picks

4 Reviewers

10 Hours of Research

​25 Products Considered

Soon it’ll be snowboarding season, and that means it’s time to take stock of your gear and make sure you’re prepared to shred some snow. Even if you’ve got a great board, you won’t be able to do epic tricks or stay comfortable for long hours without the best snowboard bindings to suit your style. 

Fortunately, you won’t have to do hours of research to find the right snowboard bindings for your setup. Our comprehensive guide and snowboard binding reviews can tell you everything you need to know and help you find the perfect set for your feet. Let’s get started!

[Overall Best Snowboard Bindings]
Union Contact Pro Snowboard Bindings

Editor's Rating:

5.0/5

Union Contact Bindings BlackUnion Contact Bindings Black

  • Excellent fit
  • Easy to adjust
  • Good flex range
  • Suitable for most snowboarding styles

Editor's Rating:

3.8/5

FLOW ALPHA SNOWBOARD BINDINGSFLOW ALPHA SNOWBOARD BINDINGS

  • Features folding highback for easy entry
  • Easy to adjust
  • Wide design for stability
[Best Women’s Snowboard Bindings]
Burton Stiletto Snowboard Women’s Bindings

Editor's Rating:

4.4/5

BURTON STILETTO SNOWBOARD WOMEN’S BINDINGSBURTON STILETTO SNOWBOARD WOMEN’S BINDINGS

  • Come with two types of mounting plates
  • Smooth glide buckles
  • Lightweight and responsive

What to Look for in the Best Snowboard Bindings of Various Types

Not all snowboard bindings are alike. They don’t just attach your ​best rated snowboard boots to your snowboard. They can affect how well you perform, how easily you can control your snowboard, and how comfortable your snowboarding experience will be. Let’s go over the main snowboard binding types so you know which to choose depending on your experience level and your goals.

Strap-In Bindings vs. Rear Entry Snowboard Bindings vs. Step-In Snowboard Bindings

Strap-in bindings are the most common type you’ll find. They usually use two straps, one for the ankle and one for the toes. Because you can find so many of these bindings, you can usually find plenty among all pricing points and some with excellent cushioning and support designs. 

Rear entry bindings have a hinging highback that lets you enter the bindings. They are easy to put on but aren’t super easy to adjust even on your best snowboard. They also aren’t very comfortable, but they do give you exceptional control and support.

Finally, step-in bindings have you “step into” the bindings, making them the fastest type of bindings to attach overall. They are still quite responsive and stable.

Best Snowboard Bindings Reviews


Editor's Rating:

5.0/5

Union ContactUnion Contact

The Union Contact Pro Snowboard Bindings have strength and versatility. They are adjustable and flexible enough to accompany all three types of snowboarders: freeriders, freestylers, and all-mountaineers. They feature aluminum ratchets and flex that is best described as soft or medium depending on how you adjust the bindings upon installation.

The highback has a 5/10 stiffness rating and the baseplate has a 4/10 stiffness rating. You’ll be able to easily adjust the bindings to fit your foot size.

The bindings come in three colors: black, blue, or camo, you can pick between medium or large sizes. This does exclude men with smaller than average feet, but they’ll still be great bindings for the vast majority of men. Keep in mind that these bindings use an international sizing scale rather than a US-specific scale. Check out the company’s website to examine how your typical binding size compares to their scaling system.

What makes these the best snowboard bindings? Only 5% of the bindings contact the snowboard, which improves performance and keeps your movements light and flexible. The bindings are made with Dureflex ST material, which improves the strength of the flex and cushions your foot without adding unnecessary weight.

These bindings also attached to miniature discs on snowboards. The discs are only sized 4x2, so examine your board before purchasing to ensure that these bindings will be compatible.

Overall, all who’ve used these bindings have had only good things to say. They fit well, allow for extra responsive movement, and don’t weigh the snowboard down, even when attempting more complex tricks.

These certainly aren’t the most affordable snowboard bindings you can find. But they are well worth the asking price if you’re in the market for a versatile, one-binding-works-for-all-styles piece of gear. These are great for snowboarders who don’t exclusively practice one type of snowboarding all season long.

Things We Liked

  • Excellent fit
  • Easy to adjust
  • Good flex range
  • Suitable for most snowboarding styles

Things We Didn't Like

  • A bit pricey
  • Size scale is a bit unfamiliar

Editor's Rating:

4.4/5

Flow Alpha Snowboard BindingsFlow Alpha Snowboard Bindings

The Flow Alpha Snowboard Bindings are incredibly affordable and still offer exceptional performance when compared to other snowboard bindings of this type. They feature a molded composite baseplate, plus a power strap that improves the comfort and durability of the bindings fitting without making things too tight or stiff.

These bindings have specialized LSR-style buckles that are supportive and don’t dig into your foot, even if you use these bindings all day long to snowboard up and down mountains. The highbacks are durable and include EVA wrap-pad cushioning. Lots of snowboarders have found that the cushioning provides extra comfort for the ankle and foot.

These bindings are also relatively wide, which improves stability and makes them exceptional for long days on the mountain. As they are rear-entry bindings, entering and exiting them takes less time than other styles of bindings.

There are a few minor drawbacks. Many people have noted that the toe buckles face down instead of up. This causes the buckles to flip up and accidentally tighten over time, so you might have to periodically adjust the fit in the field. 

In addition, the highback hinge is of the most durable on the market. It may fall apart after heavy use and stepping in and out over and over. Still, these bindings are great for the asking price. They’re a little more fragile than some would like, but the tradeoff in durability makes these affordable for snowboarders on a tighter budget.

Things We Liked

  • Features folding highback for easy entry
  • Easy to adjust
  • Wide design for stability
  • Added cushions

Things We Didn't Like

  • Highback can break easily
  • Buckles sometimes flip up and tighten accidentally

Editor's Rating:

4.4/5

Burton Stiletto Snowboard Women’s BindingsBurton Stiletto Snowboard Women’s Bindings

The Burton Stiletto Snowboard Women’s Bindings feature a lightweight baseplate that is made from bomb-proof polycarbonate. It combines exceptional durability with responsiveness and maneuverability, meaning you'll be able to shred snow without feeling weighed down. This is especially useful for women who have smaller feet and lighter bodies on average than men.

The highback is made from a single component that lets the rider experience board response immediately. Using these bindings means enjoying a smooth and agile snowboarding experience. The inclusion of a lightweight and ultra-responsive ankle wrap means that users can slip into the bindings without difficulty and without discomfort.

The bindings utilize smooth glide buckles that are reliable and durable but don't press too deeply into the foot or boot even when snowboarding all day long. The buckles all feature aluminum letters and steel bases that ensure that they will remain at their predetermined settings for hours without requiring you to bend down and periodically readjust them.

You can get these bindings in three colors: white, black, or orange. While this level of customization is nice, the included padding is made of a relatively cheap foam that doesn’t do much to reduce the impact of rougher landings. It's nice that there's a little cushioning included, but without much effect, it's essentially a waste of resources.

In addition, several snowboarders have already experienced a bit of confusion concerning the sizes of these bindings. It’s a good idea to order one size up from what you think you should order, as the bindings are a bit bulky overall and might require you to wear a size above your normal measure to make sure everything fits securely.

These bindings come with one extra bonus. They come with mounting plates for both 4x2 and 4x4 boards. This lends the bindings exceptional versatility and it’s nice that they can be used for multiple types of snowboards, making their affordable asking price even more impressive.

Things We Liked

  • Come with two types of mounting plates
  • Smooth glide buckles
  • Lightweight and responsive

Things We Didn't Like

  • Sizing is tricky
  • Padding is cheap

Editor's Rating:

4.0/5

Flox NX2 Hybrid Snowboarding Binding 2016 – Men’sFlox NX2 Hybrid Snowboarding Binding 2016 – Men’s

The Flox NX2 Hybrid Snowboarding Bindings are constructed with an aluminum alloy baseplate. This provides excellent durability while keeping the bindings maneuverable and lightweight, as the aluminum is fairly sturdy without being as heavy as steel. The bindings also have a glass-filled nylon highback, making things even lighter overall.

There’s a hybrid “powercapstrap” that’s easy to adjust and secure on the fly, with durable buckles and “active strap technology”. This tech improves the responsiveness of the buckles and prevents them from tightening too much as your feet twist and strain during tricks and jumps.

The bindings are further reinforced by a support bottom panel, which cushions your foot and can let you enjoy your snowboarding experience for longer hours without getting too fatigued. Stepping into these bindings are easy, as they use a Flow system to bend the backplate back and then re-snap it into place in just seconds. Typical attachment time is three seconds or less.

However, one big downside is the lack of an accurate sizing chart. In addition, these bindings only come in small and medium-size varieties. Since it’s difficult to determine exactly how well any foot will manage inside, we’d only recommend these for people with average-sized feet across multiple sizing charts.

Things We Liked

  • Very quick to step in and out
  • Lightweight and durable
  • Decent foot padding

Things We Didn't Like

  • No accurate sizing scales
  • No large size for bigger men

Editor's Rating:

3.5/5

Ride Rodeo MensRide Rodeo Mens

The Ride Rodeo Men’s Snowboard Bindings feature a rear-entry design with a plastic hinge that controls the highback’s movements. While this might sound cheap at first, the truth is that this hinge is relatively durable and reliable. Snapping the highback back into place is quick and easy and the highback is firm without being uncomfortable.

These Ride bindings feature a well-padded base where your foot touches the board. As a result, the bindings are among the most comfortable you’ll experience. This padding is a little unfortunate for those who desire more responsive bindings, however, as there’s lots of contact between these bindings and the board.

While the highback hinge is relatively sturdy, many of the rest of the binding components are made of a durable plastic that only somewhat holds up to wear and tear. It’s fine for moderate use but these bindings will likely begin to degrade under heavy use or under the strain that a master snowboarder can put them under. These are best used for beginners that will be doing gentler snowboarding routines, at least at first.

They feature secure straps that are easy to adjust, and the straps are also padded for increased user comfort. Overall, these are likely some of the best beginner bindings on the market, even if they have a relatively high asking price.

Things We Liked

  • Very comfortable
  • Lightweight from plastic design
  • Highback hinge is reliable

Things We Didn't Like

  • Not very sturdy

Editor's Rating:

4.0/5

Burton CartelBurton Cartel

The Burton Cartel Snowboard Bindings can be purchased in four colors: black, black and white, blue, and red. They are offered in both the small and medium sizes, and the manufacturer offers a convenient sizing chart to let you quickly discover where your typical shoe size fits in relation to their bindings.

The bindings are made with a rear-entry design and a single-component highback. The hinge is flexible and responsive and, once snapped into place, doesn’t allow for any leaning or flexibility, making these excellent for snowboarders who prefer a stiffer flex.

The Burton bindings are complemented by baseplate padding, as well as additional padding at the back near the ankle and calf. This assists with user comfort, especially if you utilize the stiffer flex adjustments offered by the bindings. Both the ankle and the toe strap use ridged straps that have less of a chance of slipping or loosening during heavy snowboarding or shredding.

Since the bindings are made from glass nylon composites and plastic, they are lightweight overall and are excellent choices for men seeking agile bindings for lighter boards. In this way, it makes sense that they aren’t offered in a large size. The bindings are made for men with lighter or smaller feet from the ground up.

Things We Liked

  • Very lightweight
  • Decent padding at bottom and ankle
  • Good, reliable straps
  • Stiff flex

Things We Didn't Like

  • Not offered in larger sizes

Editor's Rating:

5.0/5

The Union Trilogy White Snowboard Bindings are great for all types of riding. They use magnesium ratchets and other critical parts that both lend the bindings a unique and stylish aesthetic while improving the durability of the bindings as a whole. They feature a rear-entry design with a durable magnesium hinge that’s sure to last for a long time to come, even under significant wear and tear.

The Union bindings come with 2x4 and 4x4 disc mounts and channel mounts, so you can use these bindings with most types of boards. They have straps that offer a medium amount of flex, which is ideal for the versatile snowboarding styles you can adopt while using them.

The heel cup is made from aluminum and the rest of the bindings are constructed from similarly light but durable materials. The resulting bindings are easy enough to use in conjunction with lighter or heavier boards alike. 

As a final bonus, these bindings come with a lifetime warranty for the baseplate, which is easily one of the parts of bindings that most often break under heavy use. Be sure to make use of this warranty if your bindings fail earlier than expected.

The only real downside is its size. Most of their size picks are a bit large for typical female feet. Go for a smaller size than you’re used to for the best results or consult their sizing chart.

Things We Liked

  • Very durable
  • Still lightweight despite resistance
  • Stylish aesthetic
  • Comfortable for long snowboarding sessions

Things We Didn't Like

  • A bit large for some women’s feet

Editor's Rating:

5.0/5

K2 LienK2 Lien

The K2 Lien AT Snowboard Bindings look unique compared to most other bindings. They feature a 3° canted footbed that places your foot at a slight angle that is ideal for certain types of snowboarding tricks and maneuvers. The bindings also boast day special base with three holes drilled inside. This reduces the binding weight.

They’re extremely light, which is noticeable if you pair them with a light snowboard. They never feel as if they’ll break, even in subzero temperatures. You can also adjust them without the use of any tools, making them extremely user-friendly compared to more complex bindings.

With a flex rating of 4/10, these are great for a variety of snowboarding activities and styles. They feature a slender ankle strap that’s secure enough to keep you mounted to the board without worrying, but comfortable enough that you’ll be able to keep snowboarding all day without burning your foot or ankle. The perfect fit toe strap is exceptional in this same way.

There is some padding at the base, but it’s not very thick and doesn’t do much. Otherwise, these are fantastic bindings that aren’t too expensive, to boot. 

Things We Liked

  • Very easy to adjust
  • Unique design and aesthetic
  • Nice angle for foot placement
  • Good straps

Things We Didn't Like

  • Padding isn’t very comfortable

Editor's Rating:

3.5/5

Flux DS Men’s Snowboard BindingsFlux DS Men’s Snowboard Bindings

The Flux DS Men’s Snowboard Bindings feature a neon green aesthetic that appeals to the young adult and all of us. Its “Ultima” base is incredibly lightweight and allows for nearly instantaneous response times to user input. There’s a little padding at the base that does a decent job at protecting your foot without increasing the weight of the bindings as a whole.

In fact, the footbed is harder on the outside to improve your response and agility even further. This excellent design choice should make these bindings a favorite for snowboarders who like to perform tricks.

The Flux bindings also feature a waffle strap that can be worn for a long time without becoming comfortable. The included beer buckle releases smoothly and remains secure, even under significant wear and tear.

The only real downside is the neon green color, which won’t appeal to some. In addition, the buckles and many other components are only made of hard plastic that may not last for as long as some other bindings made of sturdier materials.

Things We Liked

  • Excellent base padding
  • Very responsive
  • Good straps

Things We Didn't Like

  • Neon color is quite “loud”

Freeride Bindings

Freeride bindings are tight and perfect for those who prefer lots of control over their snowboard. They have a much stiffer flex than other types of bindings. You’ll experience greater response and energy transfer across your snowboard as a result. These bindings are great for providing extra power and energy when shredding snow. 

We’d recommend these kinds of bindings for experienced snowboarders and for maintaining power and speed when snowboarding over powdery, loose snow.

Freestyle (Park) Bindings

Snowboarders who love to perform wicked tricks and who spend a lot of time snowboarding across variable terrain will want freestyle bindings. These have a flex that is a lot softer than that offered by freeride bindings. 

This gives you a little more room for error and softer landings on your ankles and knees. This can be critical when making jumps of exceptional height. These are also decent beginner bindings.

All-Mountain Bindings

All-mounting snowboard bindings are versatile and have a medium amount of flex strength when compared with freeride or freestyle bindings. These are bindings that are all-purpose enough that you can use them in a terrain park, or you can take it down a trail on any mountain. 

For snowboarders who prefer more or less fine control, you can sometimes find all-mountain bindings with stiffer or softer flexes without reaching the stiffness or softness of freestyle or freeride bindings.

Beginner Bindings

As the name might suggest, these bindings are perfect for beginner snowboarders or kids who are just starting to get into the sport using top rated all mountain snowboards. These bindings generally have soft and flexible highback designs to assist with comfort and still provide enough control. But the main purpose of these bindings is to allow for easy recovery when landing beginner jumps and slides.

Riding Style

There are three main riding styles that snowboarders fall into, either intentionally or unintentionally. The three styles are named similarly to the main three binding types: freeride, freestyle and all-mountain. The freeride style is known for its ability to be maneuverable, even in powdery snow. These are the snow shredder types. 

Freestyling bindings and snowboarders are great at tricks and in terrain parks. All-mountain snowboarders are balanced between the two extremes and can handle just about anything reasonably well.

How to Choose Your Bindings

You should choose your snowboarding bindings based on your snowboarder style. If you're a beginner, you would benefit from picking up some beginner bindings or going for all-mountain bindings, which are fine for handling most snowboarding scenarios.

If you are more experienced and want to land some sick tricks, freestyle bindings are your best bet. 

If you want to go off the trail and frequently deal with powdery snow on your rides, freeride bindings are a good choice to go with the best . Basically, you want to match your bindings with your snowboarding activity. 

You should also pay attention to snowboard binding size. Check to see which sizes a given set of bindings are compatible with. Common sizes include 2x4 or 4x4.

How to Set Up Your Bindings

To set up your bindings, first determine what kind of stance you will be assuming on your snowboard. Generally speaking, you should go with a centered stance where your bindings will be placed symmetrically between either end of your snowboard. This is great for maximum control and for landing tricks. 

You can then screw in your bindings after determining where your feet will be placed as you stand on the board. Be sure to stand on your snowboard a few times to determine the optimal stance width. Next, rotate the bindings around the disc of your snowboard.

How to Adjust Your Bindings

To adjust your bindings, consider how you want your knees to be positioned during your snowboarding experience. Placing your highback forward will force your knees to be bent and give yourself a lower center of gravity. 

Alternatively, you can have your highback relaxed somewhat, which is more forgiving and easier for recovering from fumbled landings. Experts will probably want to adjust their bindings so that their highbacks are pushed forward rather than relaxed.

Flex, Fit, and Feature

A binding’s flex is rated from 1 to 10. 1 is the softest type of flex, and 10 is the stiffest. Stiff-flexed bindings allow you greater control over your snowboard but are more unforgiving, and it’s easier to injure yourself with stiffer bindings. When it comes to fitting, the heel of your boot should be snug against the back of the binding. 

Check your bindings to see if they have any extra features, such as cushioning. This can make landing more comfortable and prevent you from damaging your feet or knees if you land from high up.

Materials, Spares, and Baseplate

The best materials for your bindings include polycarbonate, which is soft and forgiving, and urethane. This is much softer and easy to manipulate. But you can also find glass-reinforced nylon and aluminum, both of which are much stiffer. Carbon or carbon fiber is an expensive material that can improve the responsiveness of your snowboard since it's very light. 

It’s always a good idea to have spare snowboard bindings in case your primary pair break during a fall. The same goes for your best snowboard goggles.

Finally, look for a baseplate that doesn’t have a lot of bulky material. This improves the connectivity of your foot with your board, which improves responsiveness and keeps things light and maneuverable.

Butter, Boot Support and Padding

If you like to butter on your snowboard, find bindings they give you plenty of flexibility and which mesh well with your board. Buttering is more easily accomplished on a flexible snowboard, but overall your bindings just need to be comfortable.

Again, try to find some padding for your bindings if your feet and ankles are sensitive to impact. But be sure that whatever padding or cushioning you choose, it doesn’t make your bindings weigh too much or separate your foot from the board too dramatically.

Boot support can be advantageous if you have a high arch or an odd stance.

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